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Archive for February, 2013

grieveI was contacted today by yet another Girl Scout service unit manager looking to flip her troop over to Frontier Girls.  As a Gold Award recipient myself and an ex-Girl Scout leader who had a wonderful experience in scouting, it hurts my heart to see the program I loved so much quickly dying.  The Girl Scout leaders who are leaving Girl Scouts to come to Frontier Girls as an alternative are mostly leaders with 10, 15, or even 20 or more years as an experienced Girl Scout leader.  They are the service unit managers and leaders with large and active troops, the very base of the Girl Scout program.    For each of these committed leaders who contact me, I rejoice that they will be joining Frontier Girls, but I grieve that their flight from Girl Scouts means that the program I loved has changed beyond repair.

When I began Frontier Girls in 2007, after my own desertion of the Girl Scouts, it was to recreate a program that offered the girls everything I had in my own scouting experience; a chance to explore new skills, new ideas, and new places;  an opportunity to become a better citizen and kinder person;  and a chance to lead and be challenged.    As Frontier Girls  grows, and more and more experienced Girl Scout leaders join our ranks, it is my hope that the program we build together will continue to expand, offering girls more and more opportunities.  We are a grassroots group and we listen to each and every idea.   Frontier Girls is not my program, it is our program, and it will rise or fall based on how well we work together, listen to each other, and support one and other.

Frontier Girls troops and members may still be quite spread out, but I have never worked with a more committed group of women and girls.  Through our fgleaders Yahoogroup and our Facebook page I have watched friendships blossom and grow all across the country.  I have watched veteran leaders support and guide new leaders on all aspects of troop management.  I have watched girls show compassion and concern for fellow members even though they may be states away.  This is what it means to be a Frontier Girl.  It is being part of something bigger than yourself.  It is reaching out and living our motto, “If you see a need, take the lead!”

While I will always grieve for the Girls Scouts that use to be, I now rejoice in the Frontier Girls of the future.

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